Articles

The Schneider Family Book Award: A Legacy of Inspiration

Seeking books about children who were blind or had other disabilities, a 9-year-old girl began borrowing books in braille from the National Library Service for the Blind.

The girl, Katherine Schneider, went on to become the first blind student to graduate from the public school system in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

A valedictorian and a National Merit Scholar, Schneider went on to obtain her doctorate from Purdue University and become a clinical psychologist and a university professor, teaching psychology courses at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, as well as counseling, supervising and administering counseling services there.

Meet the winners of the 2014 Carnegie Corporation of New York/New York Times I Love My Librarian Award

There are a total of 165,986 certified librarians in the United States, but only a relative handful can claim membership in an elite group – a group neither defined by birth nor monetary distinction.

What they have in common is the fact that they are loved.

This week, 10 librarians representing the spectrum of library service – public, school, academic and special, received the Carnegie Corporation of New York/New York Times I Love My Librarian Award for outstanding public service to the community and ongoing commitment to changing lives through education.

A Model School Library Program in Colorado

If you are seeking an exemplary school library, look no further than the one at Eaglecrest High School in Centennial, Colorado.

The library at the high school, which is a part of the Cherry Creek School District in the southeast Denver area, earned the 2014 National School Library Program of the Year (NSLPY) Award, which is awarded by the American Association of School Librarians' (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA) and sponsored by the Follett Corporation.

The school librarians at Eaglecrest seamlessly support, and in many cases take the lead on, integrating education and technological initiatives that best serve the students.

Video games and libraries are a good mix, say librarians

Walk into any public library and, of course, you see books, reference materials, newspapers, magazines, and all types of the printed word. We might also see comic books, manga, and less traditional “literature.” These days, we encounter film, television, music, internet-connected computers, and other digital media. But video games?

Libraries lend video games, and they have been for some time. Some folks might think video games have no place in public institutions. Some articles on the web assume that readers will cringe when they hear that this is happening.  Libraries and librarians, however, seem to overwhelmingly support the practice.

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